Thread Lift—A Non-Invasive Facelift

A Thread Lift is a procedure for lifting and also tightening sagging skin on the face. The procedure is not surgical, meaning that unlike a typical facelift you won’t have to go under the knife. In fact, except for the end product, there’s little to nothing to compare between the two procedures. For instance, a surgical facelift requires that a person undergo a considerable downtime to recover whereas, with a thread lift, a person may only need one or two days to recover. What is a Thread Lift? A Thread Lift is a procedure where a type of biodegradable and absorbable suture is put in place to strategically lift and contour the skin around the mid- and lower parts of the face. The parts of the face that benefit most from a Thread Lift are: the cheeks and jowls, and the lips and neck. All places on the face where a person might suffer a breakdown in collagen, a loss in volume. The sutures, which are connected to tiny cone-like objects placed beneath the skin, both help to tighten these areas, but also encourage collagen stimulation through inflammation. Is a Thread Lift a New Type of Procedure? No, a thread lift is a type of procedure that has been around since the nineties. However, the technologies employed in those earlier procedures were slightly more invasive and, in comparison with today’s modern procedure, antiquated and limited. The sutures once used were barbed in nature, and had to be anchored to deep tissues in the scalp, temple, and brow. Recently, the FDA approved a type of absorbable medical suture that makes the...

Walking

Often, walking is overlooked as a way to stay fit. But walking is a perfectly good way to get exercise. In fact, walking has the same health benefits as any type of exercise. It’s a great way to strengthen and tone muscles, work the cardiovascular system, etc. Recently, walking as exercise has developed into the practice of counting a total number of steps taken each and every day. Pedometers worn on the wrist helps to count the steps. And, while these pedometers are effective, it’s important to set aside time each day, or a few days a week, when you walk for the purpose of getting exercise. If you are new to exercise, then start off walking short, manageable distances. Walk for exercise for one half hour, then see how you feel after. The next day you walk—this could either be the very next day, or the next day in your exercise schedule—increase your time or distance. You can walk for the same span of time, but you can increase your walking speed, which will increase your distance. One of the many benefits of walking is that you can visit different places. And, it’s an exercise that you can do practically anywhere, and in any weather—obviously, take certain precautions on days with either overly-warm or frigidly-cold weather. Pedometers and activity trackers are a useful tool—although not entirely necessary—to keeping track of steps and pace. Some modern activity trackers can track your progress through different sports—some can even track your distances when you swim and bike. Activity trackers can determine distances walked or run—some sports watches even include a barometer and...

Sleep

Everyone, at some point in their lives, will have trouble sleeping. It’s a common problem, although for some of us, it’s a chronic problem. And not only is a lack of sleep detrimental to our bodies health, but it also affects the things we do: work, relationships, responsibilities—which works like a double-edged sword, because oftentimes work, relationships, and responsibilities are the reasons why a person can’t sleep at night. So, here a few tips to achieving a better night’s sleep. Schedule, Schedule, Schedule Our bodies do well with a schedule. If you go to bed at nearly the same time at night, your body is going to fall into the habit of going to bed at that time. Also, try and wake up at the same time every morning—most adults need seven to eight hours of sleep every night, so it’s important to set aside no more than eight hours (unless you’re someone who needs more). Yes, there will be variances in this schedule on the weekends or on vacation, but try and keep the differences as minimal as possible—don’t fall into leisurely everyday vacation habits that reset your body’s sleep schedule! Food and Drink Food and drink affects our sleep. If our bodies are trying to digest food, this will affect how we go to sleep. Avoid sugary, caffeinated drinks within four hours—or more—of bedtime. Alcohol can have a calming, sleepy effect on our bodies, and it may help us to fall asleep quickly, however alcohol can disrupt our sleep patterns as the night wears on. Sleep in Comfort You need to create an ideal place for you...

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