A Healthy Fall Season

In Montana, fall is a terrific season. No, we don’t, usually, get the weeks-long tree canopies of orange and yellow like they do in the east. We get pretty fall colors, but it’s over and done rather quickly, by comparison. But in Montana fall marks an amazing time to be outside, walking, recreating, etc. But it’s also a good time to focus on food (Thanksgiving is only one month away), and the foods of the fall can be both splendid and healthy. Here’s a few examples. Pumpkin Seeing past the pumpkin pie is hard to do: for many of us, pumpkin pie is one of fall’s great food treasures. And that’s because it’s delicious. But, pumpkin can have so many uses, and it’s very good for our bodies; it’s absolutely loaded with vitamins. First, consider the seeds: pumpkin seeds are great for our bodies, our blood stream. You can buy pumpkin seeds at most stores, but you can also reserve the seeds from that Halloween pumpkin, at the end of the month. Roasting your own pumpkin seeds is fun and easy and rewarding. So, scrape out the goo, the seeds, and then what do we have? Pumpkin flesh. Pumpkin can be roasted and pureed at home. This puree (which is similar in consistency to canned pumpkin, and, if you don’t have the time to roast and puree a pumpkin, most brands of canned pumpkin make a fine substitute) can be used for pie (Yes, pumpkin pie), but also for pumpkin pancakes, muffins, cookies, etc. And its consistency makes it simple and easy to use. Cabbage Cabbage doesn’t seem to have...

Heartburn

Heartburn is a common condition that affects nearly everyone at some point in their life. The causes of heartburn vary and can include spicy foods, acidic foods—i.e. tomatoes—fattening foods, sugary drinks, chocolate, peppermint, caffeinated drinks such as tea and coffee—believe it or not tea is a bigtime heartburn trigger for some people—tobacco use, and alcohol. But heartburn can also be a condition derived from a bodily condition such as obesity. It’s also possible for pregnant women to suffer heartburn caused by pregnancy—in most cases, the symptoms of heartburn go away once the baby is born. What is Heartburn? Heartburn happens when the acids in the stomach back up into the esophagus (the esophagus is the tube connecting your mouth to your stomach). There is a muscle in the esophagus near the entrance to the stomach that allows food and drink to go in, but then restricts to keep the stomach acids from escaping. You may experience heartburn as a burning feel in your chest, just behind your breastbone; although, it’s also possible to experience the pain of heartburn as a dull throb anywhere in the chest area (it’s also important to note that any pain in the chest could be a sign of a more serious condition, such as heart attack, so if the pain is severe, seizing, or throbbing with heavy pressure, immediately consult your doctor or to head to the hospital). For the less severe symptoms of heartburn, there are at-home remedies. Lifestyle Changes If you suffer from heartburn, try and understand its underlying cause. Which foods are causing the heartburn? How much exercise are you getting?...

Eye Fatigue

Eye fatigue is becoming more and more common. Why? Well, a likely culprit is the screen on which you’re currently reading this article. No, you don’t have to stop reading this article, right this minute. But you need to know that there are side-effects, like eye fatigue, for long term screen use. The proper term for it is computer vision syndrome. It’s also called digital eyestrain. And it affects people who look at screens for more than two hours each and every day. Now, that number, two hours, is going to encapsulate a lot of us. At least everyone who works on a computer, who then answers calls and emails on their cell phones, and who then goes home at night to blow off some steam with Netflix. Try it. Add up your hours of screen time—you will probably be surprised. It’s probably more than two. Eyestrain has many symptoms that include: tired, itchy and watery eyes, headaches, a sore back or neck or shoulders—although these could also be caused by poor posture (and poor posture is also a cause of eye strain!)—you may also have trouble opening your eyes, or have a difficulty concentrating. Thankfully, however, eyestrain is not a permanent condition. How do you combat the effects of eyestrain? The simple answer is to use computers less. But that’s not a practical answer for many of us. Many of us have to work around computers all day long. It’s become the new normal. But, we all need to make sure that we’re taking adequate breaks. Our eyes need time away from the screen. Get up every hour...

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This